Radioactive Wolves ~ Full Episode. Chernobyl 25 Years On – A Land Without Humans

See on Scoop.itEnvironment and Biodiversity

 

 

 

October 19, 2011 PBS NATURE

A SUPERB WATCH (55:00)

“RADIOACTIVE WOLVES” CHERNOBYL 25 YEARS ON: A LAND WITHOUT HUMANS

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/radioactive-wolves/full-episode/7190/

Program Description:

What happens to nature after a nuclear accident? And how does wildlife deal with the world it inherits after human inhabitants have fled? The historic nuclear accident at Chernobyl is now 25 years old. Filmmakers and scientists set out to document the lives of the packs of wolves and other wildlife thriving in the “dead zone” that still surrounds the remains of the reactor…. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/radioactive-wolves/full-episode/7190/

 

                                   — MORE OF MY FAVORITES —

 

July 27, 2011 NOVA (Australia) (55:00)
“LIZARD KINGS”  Meet the monitors, the largest, fiercest and craftiest lizards on Earth http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/lizard-kings.html

 

Program Description
They look like dragons and inspire visions of fire-spitting monsters. But these creatures with their long claws, razor-sharp teeth, and muscular, whip-like tails are actually monitors, the largest lizards now walking the planet. With their acute intelligence, monitors—including the largest of all, the Komodo dragon—are a very different kind of reptile, blurring the line between reptiles and mammals. Thriving on Earth essentially unchanged since the time of the dinosaurs, they are a very successful species, versatile at adapting to all kinds of settings. This program looks at what makes these long-tongued reptiles so similar to mammals and what has allowed them to become such unique survivors… http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/lizard-kings.html

 

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November 30, 2011 NOVA
“THE INCREDIBLE JOURNEY OF THE BUTTERFLIES” Follow the 2,000-mile migration of monarchs to a sanctuary in the highlands of Mexico… http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/journey-butterflies.html

 

Program Description
Orange-and-black wings fill the sky as NOVA charts one of nature’s most remarkable phenomena: the epic migration of monarch butterflies across North America. To capture a butterfly’s point of view, NOVA’s filmmakers used a helicopter, ultralight, and hot-air balloon for aerial views along the transcontinental route. This wondrous annual migration,
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/nature/journey-butterflies.html

 

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April 10, 2013 NOVA – Four Part Series
AUSTRALIA: FIRST 4 BILLION YEARS: One of the strangest landscapes on Earth reveals our planet’s complex history .. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/earth/australia-first-years.html

Program Description
Of all the continents on Earth, none preserves a more spectacular story of our planet’s origins than Australia. NOVA’s four-part “Australia’s First 4 Billion Years” takes viewers on a rollicking adventure from the birth of the Earth to the emergence of the world we know today. With help from host and scientist Richard Smith, we meet titanic dinosaurs and giant kangaroos, sea monsters and prehistoric crustaceans, disappearing mountains and deadly asteroids. Epic in scope, intimate in nature, this is the untold story of the land “down under,” the one island continent that has got it all. Join NOVA on the ultimate Outback road trip, an exploration of the history of the planet as seen through the window of the Australian continent… http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/earth/australia-first-years.html

 

MASS WOLF KILLINGS ARE BASED ON THE MOST CYNICAL OF PREMISES http://sco.lt/7PRq7t

 

 

See on www.pbs.org

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